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Ambipolar quantum dots in planar silicon

NOV
13
2019
13. NOV 2019

Presentation Hall B1 SEMICON EUROPA > TechARENA 1 & 2 - Technological Platform for Innovation > Disruptive Computing

14:05-14:25 h | Hall B1 Tech Arena 2, Booth B1.770

Subjects: SEMICON EUROPA

Type: Presentation

Speech: English

We create ambipolar quantum dots in planar silicon nanoscale transistors. We first investigate the conformity of Al, Ti and Pd nanoscale gates by means of transmission electron microscopy [1]. Next we define low-disorder electron quantum dots with Pd gates [2], and depletion-mode hole quantum dots in undoped silicon [3]. For the latter we use fixed charge in a SiO/AlO dielectric stack to induce a 2DHG at the Si/SiO interface. The depletion-mode design avoids complex multilayer architectures requiring precision alignment and allows directly adopting best practices already developed for depletion dots in other material systems. Finally, I will show ambipolar charge sensing: we have fabricated a single-electron transistor next to a single-hole transistor, and tuned both quantum dots to simultaneously sense charge transitions of the other quantum dot. Using active charge sensing the single-hole transistor can detect the few-charge regime in the electron quantum dot.[1] P. C. Spruijtenburg, Nanotechnology, (2018).[2] M. Brauns , Scientific Reports 8, 5690, (2018).[3] S. V. Amitonov , Applied Physics Letters 112, 023102 (2018).

Informations

Prof. Dr. Floris Zwanenburg

Floris Zwanenburg (1976) studied applied physics at the TU Delft. In 2008 he received his PhD for research on semiconductor nanowires with Leo Kouwenhoven. As a post-doc at UNSW in Sydney he worked with silicon quantum dots. This system has a unique fabrication scheme offering unprecedented control over all relevant parameters, as he demonstrated by reaching the single-electron regime in a highly tunable Si quantum dot. With his team at UNSW he has also used this system to read out the spin of a single electron (Nature, 2010) and to create a nuclear spin qubit (Nature, 2013). In 2011, he returned to the Netherlands for a tenure track position at the University of Twente. After initial collaborative efforts with the Dzurak team from UNSW on silicon quantum-dot technology, his team has extended this design to an ambipolar circuit, with which he has defined electron and hole quantum dots in a single device. Since 2013 he has had a new project on quantum dots and superconductivity in Ge/Si core/shell nanowires. In the past ten years he has become an expert in silicon quantum electronics: the quantum mechanical behaviour of single electron or hole spins confined to (artificial) atoms in silicon.

Location

Eingang
Nord-West
ICM
Eingang
Nord
Eingang
West
Atrium
Eingang
Nord-Ost
Eingang
Ost
Conference
Center Nord
Freigelände
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6

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